Star Daughter by Shveta Thakrar — ARC Review

Star Daughter by Shveta Thakrar

Summary:

The daughter of a star and a mortal, Sheetal is used to keeping secrets. Pretending to be “normal.” But when an accidental flare of her starfire puts her human father in the hospital, Sheetal needs a full star’s help to heal him. A star like her mother, who returned to the sky long ago.

Sheetal’s quest to save her father will take her to a celestial court of shining wonders and dark shadows, where she must take the stage as her family’s champion in a competition to decide the next ruling house of the heavens–and win, or risk never returning to Earth at all.

This gorgeously imagined YA debut blends shades of Neil Gaiman’s Stardust and a breathtaking landscape of Hindu mythology into a radiant contemporary fantasy.

Review: 4 Stars

When I first heard about Star Daughter I knew I had to read it. I love books based on religious myths and other cultures and I was excited to learn a bit about Hindu myths and gods. This book was so richly magical and so incredibly unique. I had no idea what a half star girl would be like, but the idea sounded fascinating and it was so much more magical than I could have dreamed. Star Daughter was a beautiful fantasy novel full of culture and music.

The world built in this book was wild. Star Daughter was so different from anything I have ever read. Parts of the story were so vividly described, but other parts were a little abstract and I had a hard time picturing what was going on. There is a lot of Indian culture and Hindu myths woven into this story and I really with that the book had a glossary so I could understand it all better. I did wind up doing a lot of research and Googling to help myself understand Indian culture better. While you can read this book without understanding all of the references I felt like I had a richer experience with it after Googling the things that I didn’t know.

The characters were so incredible. Sheetal was easy to relate to and I was rooting for her all the way through the book. I loved her friendship with Minal, it was so genuine and they were truly there for each other. I feel like healthy female friendships are so rare in YA, and Sheetal and Minal’s friendship was such a fun aspect of this story. The banter between Sheetal and Minal about Radhikafoi, Sheetal’s aunt, never failed to make me smile. I didn’t love the romance in this book though. For a large part of the plot it takes a back seat, but it came together in the end and I felt like it was a bit glossed over. Plus I was just never a big fan of Dev in the first place.

Every part of this book was so magical that I found myself so absorbed in it. The plot was pretty great. It was a bit slower paced and definitely more of a character driven story, but I was still very invested in the plot as well. There was one point in the middle where I was getting bored, but for the most part I didn’t want to set the book down. I pick up nearly every book that I see compared to Laini Taylor, but this is probably the first book that was as magical and unique as Laini Taylor’s writing really is, so if you enjoy her books, you might love Star Daughter too!

Star Daughter was such a rich and cultural fantasy. It was so unique and magical that I don’t think I will ever forget this story. If you enjoy fantasies inspired by other cultures or just enjoy rich and lush magical books, I would highly recommend checking this one out!

12 thoughts on “Star Daughter by Shveta Thakrar — ARC Review

Add yours

  1. Fab review! This is one that I’ve been particularly excited to read because it sounds amazing and I love that it’s got elements of Indian culture and Hindu mythology! It really sounds so unique (plus that cover is insanely gorgeous)!

    Liked by 1 person

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